As the weather had improved slightly (enough at least!) to go out for a higher level walk I decided to do all the fells on Fellbarrow.
Date: 11th January 2015 Distance: 10.2km (6.33 Miles) Parking: Roadside Car Park at Loweswater  
Start Location: Loweswater Ascent (m/ft): 685m (2247ft) Weather:

Cloudy - Windy (50mph Gusts)

Time Started: 10:22 Highest Point: Low Fell (423m/1388ft) Difficulty: Moderate
Duration: 2 Hours 36 Minutes        
Route: Loweswater - Mosser Fell Road - Mosser Fell - Hatteringill Head (385m/1263ft) - Fellbarrow (416m/1365ft) - Smithy Fell (392m/1286ft) - Sourfoot Fell (411m/1348ft) - Low Fell (423m/1388ft) - Loweswater Fell (Low Fell South Top) (412m/1352ft) - Darling Fell (391m/1283ft) - Mosser Fell Road - Loweswater

Carling Knott and Burnbank Fell above Loweswater.

Now walking along the Mosser Fell Road and thats Fellbarrow over to the right.

Sourfoot Fell.


Fellbarrow not much further ahead - still almost 200m to ascend.


Before going to the summit of Fellbarrow I made a detour down to Hatteringill Head.

Hatteringill Head summit cairn. Snowy Grasmoor behind.

The summit of Fellbarrow. The wind was pretty cold up here - I would say around minus 10.

I hid behind the trig column to have something to eat but couldn't sit long in this wind.
The summit of Smithy Fell. Time to head over to Soutfoot Fell.
Sourfoot Fell summit looking to the next peak - Low Fell. It was near here where the wind really started to pick up.
Watching Crag and Lorton Vale.
The highest point on the Fellbarrow Group - Low Fell at 423m.
The lower top of Low Fell - Birkett lists this as Loweswater Fell and is regarded as the Wainwright Summit. The view from here is far better than the other summit.
Burnbank Fell and Loweswater.
Darling Fell - the next and last peak of the day.
Buttermere and Crummock Water from Low Fell.
Fantastic lakeland view from the ascent of Darling Fell. This was the hardest 15 minutes of the whole walk. It was steep!
The view opening up more the higher I get.
Darling Fell cairn.
And again but looking to the highest point which is a metre or so higher.